Who We Are: Get to Know the Heart Behind the Brain at LearningRx.org

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LearningRx.orgIntroducing a brand new LearningRx website… LearningRx.org!

Parents with children who struggle to learn are careful to choose wisely which programs they invest in. They want a program that is created by and run by people who care for them and their children, from the heart.  The purpose of LearningRx.org is to give parents the confidence that we are indeed that kind of company.

Another reason for the creation of LearningRx.org is that we receive many questions about the background and identity of our company, and before now we have not had a convenient place on the web that provides the answers to these questions. So, the LearningRx.org pages focus on answering questions about LearningRx, Inc. with information that might not be readily available on our other web presences.

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June 15th is National Brain Training Day!

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National Brain Training DayJune 15th is National Brain Training Day! On June 1st, LearningRx, the country’s leading personal brain training company declared June 15th National Brain Training Day. The day was declared with two purposes in mind. First, to dispel myths around cognitive skills training. Secondly, to raise awareness of the phenomenal gains the right type of brain training can bring.

“LearningRx brain training can dramatically improve learning and reading skills for almost anyone,” says LearningRx Vice President of Research and Development Tanya Mitchell. “Every day we see our brain training bring measurable, dramatic gains that result in faster, more efficient thinking. Our graduates consistently enjoy better reading skills, improved grades and increased confidence and self-esteem.”

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4 Steps to Becoming a Better Reader

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Young GirlHow do we learn to read? It isn’t as simple as you might think. In a recent article, Sabra Gelfond, Speech-Language Pathologist and Executive Director of the National Speech / Language Therapy Center, compared the way we learn to read to the way a house is built. There are four major steps to both, she points out, and in both home-building and brain-building, laying a strong foundation is critical.

Learn to Read: Building Readers, Step by Step

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QUIZ: Do You Know the Difference Between Brain Training and Tutoring?

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brain training or tutoringDoes your child need brain training or tutoring? What’s the difference? Do you know? Take this short quiz, and see if you can tell the difference. Get a piece of paper, read through the two scenarios in each question, and write down which story is like brain training and which story is like tutoring.

Brain training or tutoring? Question #1

a.) An 9-year old boy is going out for soccer. He gets on to the team, but he starts to have trouble aiming the ball in the direction he wants it to go when he kicks. His coach pulls him aside and shows him how to control the angle of his kick, and tells him to go home and practice it. The boy practices his kick, and improves.

b.) Another young boy wants to play soccer, and tries out for the team. He cannot run as fast as the other boys, and is badly uncoordinated, so he doesn’t make the team. The coach suggests some weight training and balance exercises, and tells the boy that if he does those things faithfully, and runs every day, he will have a better chance to make the team next time. The next year, the boy comes back stronger and faster, and makes the team.

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Please Stop Talking

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Bored child in school classroomPlease stop talking. That’s what your child who is a kinesthetic learner is thinking – more often than you realize. Please just stop saying words, and let me do something. Let me please get up out of my chair. I’m going crazy here! Some teachers or parents may think a child is being stubborn, impatient, or a know-it-all, when really they just want you to get the message: they learn by doing, instead of listening.

If you have a little boy who would rather tear his truck apart than drive it around the living room carpet, he’s probably a kinesthetic learner. Does your daughter’s teacher complain that she’s always getting up to sharpen her pencil or ask to go to the bathroom? Don’t worry – it’s not ADHD, she’s a kinesthetic leaner. Does your high school student fall asleep on the couch with his textbook on his face? Kinesthetic learner.

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