Category: IQ and LearningRx

May 7 is National Barrier Awareness Day

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Both visible and invisible barrier can limit the success of otherwise very capable children, teens and adults. From attention struggles and dyslexia, to dysgraphia (trouble with numbers) and memory issues, invisible barriers like weak cognitive skills can sometimes cause extreme frustration because the problem is often unknown. Kids and teens are blamed for being “lazy” or “dumb” when in fact they’re just as smart as their peers—or smarter! Adults are labeled as “unmotivated,” when the reality is that they’re struggling with a learning disability.

Worried that weak cognitive skills are making life harder than it has to be for you or someone you love? Take our free Learning Skills Discovery Survey to find out how to overcome your barriers: https://lsds.learningrx.com/

 

7 Myths About the Brain that Might Surprise You

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  1. MYTH: You’re either left-brained or right-brained.
    This long-standing myth has been debunked. There is no evidence that people preferentially use one side of their brain more.2. MYTH: Cognitive decline is not impacted by choices or circumstances.
    We now understand that there are lots of things you can do that appear to fight cognitive decline: exercise, social interaction, good nutrition, brain stimulation and one-on-one brain training.

    3. MYTH: IQ cannot be changed.
    We now know the brain is “plastic,” that is, capable of changing at any age. And since IQ is simply a measurement of cognitive skills, stronger abilities translate into higher IQ.

    4. MYTH: Brain size determines intelligence.
    On average, the male brain is about 10 percent larger than the female brain, but it has nothing to do with intelligence.

    5. MYTH: Alcohol kills brain cells.
    It’s not that brain cells are being killed off by excessive alcohol consumption, it’s that the dendrites (which help cells communicate) are being damaged.

    6. MYTH: Some people are just destined to be bad at math.
    Struggles with math, called “dyscalculia,” are often caused by weak cognitive skills, which can be trained. Brain training works on the skills needed to learn, process and recall math-related information—such as visual processing, working memory and logic & reasoning.

    7. MYTH: Dyslexia is about reading letters backwards.
    Dyslexia simply means “trouble with words” and even smart kids can be dyslexic. In people with dyslexia, the weakest cognitive skills are often phonemic awareness and auditory processing, although other areas may suffer as well. Personal brain training can target and train these weak skills.

Who’s to Blame for a Bad Report Card?

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Report cards.

Seldom have two words caused such anxiety for both students and parents. For some, poor grades can reflect feelings of inadequacy (as a student or a parent), worries about being held back a grade, or fears of not getting into a good college.

Who’s to blame for learning struggles?

For parents, these feelings can manifest as blame: blaming their child, their child’s teacher, and/or themselves. And while many people assume that less-than-stellar grades are a reflection of poor teaching, lack of intelligence, student laziness, or poor parenting, these assumptions are almost always untrue.

The truth is that bad report cards are not a reflection of IQ. In fact, many struggling learners have higher-than-average IQ scores. IQ assessments measure an average of the combined strength of all our cognitive skills—the underlying tools we need to successfully focus, think, prioritize, plan, understand, visualize, remember, solve problems, and create useful association. These skills include things like attention, visual and auditory processing, memory, logic & reasoning, and processing speed.

It’s very common for a student to have an average or above-average IQ score and a learning problem at the same time. For example, a child who struggles with reading may have a severe deficiency in sound blending and phonemic awareness (two sub skills of auditory processing), and be well above average in other cognitive abilities. When you lump it all together, it’ll look like there’s no problem because the IQ score is average (or even above-average. In fact, that high score is masking what could be a serious problem.

What about genetics?

It’s not surprising that parents who struggled in school themselves often experience anxiety over their children’s report cards. Concerns may stem from parents’ hoping that their children get better grades than they did. Parents may also fear that they’ve somehow genetically passed on their learning struggles to their offspring.

Certainly, genetics can contribute to a small part of learning struggles (like some reading difficulties); but the majority of learning struggles are simply the result of weak cognitive skills. In a way that is good news, since weak cognitive skills can be targeted, trained, and strengthened. They are not “set in stone.”

So how do you strengthen weak cognitive skills?

Cognitive skills training (also known as “personal brain training”) incorporates immediate feedback, intensity and loading, among other features. The most effective brain training starts with a cognitive skills assessment to identify weak skills, then uses customized programs of fun, intense mental exercise to strengthen those weak skills.

Unlike tutoring, which is academics-based, brain training is skills-based. While tutoring can be effective when a student has fallen behind in specific subjects (such as history) due to an illness, injury, or family move, cognitive training targets the underlying skills needed to perform tasks (like reading) that make learning easier in any subject.

If your child is struggling in school, take the first step toward helping your child become a more confident learner by having his or her cognitive skills assessed. Cognitive testing usually takes an about an hour, and can pinpoint the weak skills that are making learning (and life!) harder than it needs to be. Click on the link below to find a LearningRx center near you and speak with someone about scheduling a cognitive assessment.

“This is Too Hard!” 5 ways to help a child with a learning disability

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It’s painful watching your child struggle in school, but there are things you can do to help. Find out how to turn “This is too hard!” to “I can do this!” with these 5 tips.

  1. Remind them that even very smart kids can have a learning disability; it’s not necessary an indication of intelligence. Explain that Albert Einstein had ADHD and Thomas Edison had dyslexia and look how brilliant they were!
  2. Enroll them in personal brain training. Most learning disabilities are due to weak cognitive skills. If weak cognitive skills are, indeed, causing your child to struggle, that’s actually good news because there is something you can do about it: weak skills can be strengthened. One-on-one brain training provides a way to strengthen the core skills the brain uses to think and perform. And because every brain training program is customized, even extremely smart kids can benefit from brain training. LearningRx brain trainers work with clients of all ages about five hours a week, for 12 to 32 weeks, depending on the program. Workout sessions are customized to meet the individual objectives—and strengthen weak skills—unique to each client. And because workouts consist of game-like mental exercises, clients of all ages typically enjoy the experience.
  3. Make decisions based on facts, not assumptions. Many parents mistakenly believe that learning disabilities, such as dyslexia, are a lifelong label, or that some kids are genetically destined to always be bad at math. These are myths that can keep parents from seeking out help.
  4.  Don’t give up! At LearningRx, we hear time and time again about parents who put their child in tutoring with little to no results. That’s because tutoring is a great solution when there is an identifiable, external reason that a student did not grasp classroom content the first time it was presented in class. Perhaps a child was sick or on vacation, or a relocation in the middle of the school year created a gap in curriculum. It’s also possible that something (like an extended illness or pregnancy) impacted the consistent delivery of material. The point is, when something has interfered with the delivery of content to your child, hiring a tutor to reteach that content makes sense. On the other hand, brain training does not reteach missed content, but instead exercises and strengthens the basic skills the brain uses to think, learn, and perform. In other words, brain training improves the way the brain grasps information the first time it is presented. So, if your child is struggling in more than one class, or struggling year after year, weak cognitive skills may be to blame. And if they are, brain training can strengthen those skills.
  5. Start with baby steps. You don’t need to figure everything out at once. Begin by taking one or two small actions to get the ball rolling. Talk to your child’s teacher about specific issues your child displays, such as speaking out of turn, difficulty staying organized or taking longer than most students to complete tests. Call your local LearningRx to schedule a cognitive skills assessment. The one-hour assessment will provide a detailed look at your child’s individual cognitive strengths and weaknesses, and will give you invaluable information you need in order to decide on the next best step to help your child.

The 2017 Smart Mom’s Toy Box

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10 Classic Games from YOUR Childhood that Boost Brain Skills

If you’re like most of us, you feel torn between letting your child spend time on their technology and getting some free time of your own to get something done (even if that something is a nap).

But what if there was a compromise? What if you chose games and toys that are fun for your kids, but also boost cognitive skills, like memory, auditory & visual processing, attention, logic & reasoning, and processing speed? That’s exactly what you will find in our 2017 Smart Mom’s Toy Box …

LearningRx (www.learningrx.com) has put together a list of classic games that you’ll probably recognize from your own childhood—some with a modern spin. Chances are, you’ll bond with your child, have fun, and maybe boost some of YOUR brain skills in the process!

Simon

Try to repeat increasingly complex patterns with this fast-paced, handheld, electronic game.

Ages: 8+

Cognitive skills: auditory processing, visual processing, memory, attention, processing speed, executive processing, inductive reasoning, sustained attention


Rubik’s Cube

Challenge yourself to match up the colors on all six sides.

Ages: 8+

Cognitive skills: planning, visual processing, logic & reasoning, attention, working memory, problem solving


Chess

Use strategy to capture your opponent’s king before they get yours.

Ages: 6+

Cognitive skills: divided attention, executive processing, logic & reasoning, planning, problem solving, sequential processing, strategy


Battleship

Locate your enemy’s ships and destroy all five before they sink yours.

Ages: 7+

Cognitive skills: logic & reasoning, planning, problem solving, working memory


Stratego

Devise a plan to capture your opponent’s flag in this classic battlefield game of strategy.

Ages: 8+

Cognitive skills: logic & reasoning, planning, short-term memory, working memory


Uno

Get rid of all your cards first to earn points from other players.

Ages: 7+

Cognitive skills: logic & reasoning, short-term memory, sustained attention, visual processing, working memory


Puzzles

Jigsaw puzzles are relaxing, but they’re also working your brain skills!

Ages: 2+

Cognitive skills: deductive reasoning, inductive reasoning, planning, problem solving, short-term memory, visual processing, working memory


Cribbage

Group and play cards in combinations to gain points.

Ages: 7+

Cognitive skills: divided attention, executive processing, logic & reasoning, mental math, numerical concept, problem solving


Connect 4

Be the first to get four discs in a row.

Ages: 6+

Cognitive skills: divided attention, executive processing, logic & reasoning, planning, problem solving, sequential processing, strategy


Scrabble

Earn points by making high-scoring words out of your letter tiles.

Ages: 8+

Cognitive skills: deductive reasoning, inductive reasoning, long-term memory, problem solving, sequential processing, short-term memory, simultaneous processing, visual processing, word attack


Ready to head to the store (or online!) to do your holiday shopping? Take this list, or download a free Games for Skills Chart at: www.unlocktheeinsteininside.com.