Category: Intelligence

10 Myths About Learning Disabilities (and Why They’re False)

It’s not your fault. You’ve taken the advice of well-meaning experts, Googled a few topics, and heard that tutoring helped your neighbor’s daughter after she missed two weeks of school due to appendicitis. And you’re not alone. The myths you’ve believed about learning disabilities have been around for years (with no ill intent!) because we didn’t know better! But now, thanks to advances in science, cognitive remediation programs, and genetic research, we understand more than we ever have about the intricacies of the brain and learning. Here are 10 of the more common myths surrounding learning disabilities and why we now know they’re false.

https://media.learningrx.com/ten-myths-about-learning-disabilities-and-why-theyre-false-2/

June 6 is National Higher Education Day

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Two parts to smart: Is your teen college-ready?

Here’s some unsettling information: Just because your teen can remember math formulas or the timeline of World War II doesn’t mean they’re ready for college. In fact, brain experts will tell you that there are actually two parts to smart – knowledge and IQ – and you need both of them to get into the top colleges and universities. So, what’s the difference? Find out here, along with what you can do to help them prepare for college.

Two parts to smart: Is your teen college-ready?

Bully Thyself: When your kid thinks they’re stupid

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After a disappointing report card, it’s not always about anger for most parents; it’s about frustration and heartbreak. They see their child is trying, but struggling, and don’t know how to fix it. Worse still is when your child bullies himself, saying he’s “stupid” or worrying that she’ll fall behind her peers. But there’s not much you can do, right? Actually, we’ve got some ideas.

https://www.learningrxblog.com/2015/05/21/what-to-do-when-your-kid-says-heartbreaking-words-like-these/

7 Myths About the Brain that Might Surprise You

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  1. MYTH: You’re either left-brained or right-brained.
    This long-standing myth has been debunked. There is no evidence that people preferentially use one side of their brain more.2. MYTH: Cognitive decline is not impacted by choices or circumstances.
    We now understand that there are lots of things you can do that appear to fight cognitive decline: exercise, social interaction, good nutrition, brain stimulation and one-on-one brain training.

    3. MYTH: IQ cannot be changed.
    We now know the brain is “plastic,” that is, capable of changing at any age. And since IQ is simply a measurement of cognitive skills, stronger abilities translate into higher IQ.

    4. MYTH: Brain size determines intelligence.
    On average, the male brain is about 10 percent larger than the female brain, but it has nothing to do with intelligence.

    5. MYTH: Alcohol kills brain cells.
    It’s not that brain cells are being killed off by excessive alcohol consumption, it’s that the dendrites (which help cells communicate) are being damaged.

    6. MYTH: Some people are just destined to be bad at math.
    Struggles with math, called “dyscalculia,” are often caused by weak cognitive skills, which can be trained. Brain training works on the skills needed to learn, process and recall math-related information—such as visual processing, working memory and logic & reasoning.

    7. MYTH: Dyslexia is about reading letters backwards.
    Dyslexia simply means “trouble with words” and even smart kids can be dyslexic. In people with dyslexia, the weakest cognitive skills are often phonemic awareness and auditory processing, although other areas may suffer as well. Personal brain training can target and train these weak skills.