Category: Brain Research

Pavlov’s Tween: Why Adolescence is the Perfect Time to do Brain Training

New research published in Nature Communications has found that adolescents’ brains react more responsively to receiving rewards. (If you’re curious, the World Health Organization defines adolescence as the period between the ages of 10 and 19.)

Although this strong reward system can lead to risky behavior, it can also be used to make learning easier. It’s something that we at LearningRx have been putting to work in our personal brain training programs for decades. Read more here:

https://media.learningrx.com/pavlovs-tween-why-adolescence-is-the-perfect-time-to-do-brain-training/

Can Allergies Help Your Memory? Researchers think so.

When has having allergies ever been a good thing? Maybe the time has come! When researchers in Austria exposed mice to grass pollen to induce an allergic reaction, they found that the reaction stimulated the growth of new neurons. It appears as though allergic reactions suppress the decline of creating new memories, which happens with aging.

 

 

Read more: http://www.learningrx.org/allergies-may-actually-help-memory/

Scientists studied Sting’s brain—and here’s what they found

Earlier this year, 16-time Grammy Award-winner Sting was in Montreal for a concert. While he was there, he agreed to have his brain scanned by researchers who wanted to understand how he relates and classifies music.

To the average listener, certain songs might seem like they have nothing in common. But when Sting listened to two seemingly unrelated songs (like the Beatles’ “Girl” and Piazzola’s “Libertango”), brain scans unveiled the connections that Sting was able to hear, such as tempo, melodic motifs and what key the songs are in.

A paper about the research was published in “Neurocase.”

To read more about the fascinating study, click here.

 

 

About LearningRx
LearningRx, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the largest one-on-one brain training organization in the world. With 80 Centers in the U.S., and locations in 40 countries around the globe, LearningRx has helped more than 95,000 individuals and families sharpen their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn easier, and perform better. Their on-site programs partner every client with a personal brain trainer to keep clients engaged, accountable, and on-task—a key advantage over online-only brain exercises. Their pioneering methods have been used in clinical settings for 35 years and have been verified as beneficial in peer-reviewed research papers and journals. To learn more about LearningRx research results, programs, and their 9.6 out of 10 client satisfaction rating visit http://www.learningrx.com/. To read testimonials from real clients visit www.learningrx-reviews.com.

How Facebook Could Be Working Hand-in-Hand With Your Own Brain Chemistry

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Social networksDid you know:

864 million people use Facebook on a daily basis? Or that the time spent on Facebook per user per day is more than twenty minutes?

What’s very interesting is that much of the success of Facebook can be attributed to brain chemistry.  The way Facebook is set up triggers the release of dopamine, a brain chemical that is linked to pleasurable feelings of reward, and also oxytocin, the “love hormone” that helps us feel close to people we care about.

One of the things about Facebook that releases the feel-good chemical dopamine in our brains is simply looking at pictures of attractive people.  And because these people are usually folks that we know and care about, it can also increase the release of oxytocin.

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