Category: Behavior and Symptoms

Bully Thyself: When your kid thinks they’re stupid

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After a disappointing report card, it’s not always about anger for most parents; it’s about frustration and heartbreak. They see their child is trying, but struggling, and don’t know how to fix it. Worse still is when your child bullies himself, saying he’s “stupid” or worrying that she’ll fall behind her peers. But there’s not much you can do, right? Actually, we’ve got some ideas.

https://www.learningrxblog.com/2015/05/21/what-to-do-when-your-kid-says-heartbreaking-words-like-these/

New Year, New Student!

Start the year off right with improved study habits

Returning to school after the long holiday break can be tough, but now is the time to set routines that will stick for the rest of the school year. If your child is struggling in school, it’s possible that stronger study skills could make a difference in his or hearing learning success. There are ways you can help your child develop more effective study habits.

Encourage your child to put the following suggestions into practice:

Set daily and weekly goals.Help your child developdaily and weekly plans, as well as ways to measure their success. Write these goals down, either on paper or digitally.Here are some examples of questions your child should ask himself on a regular basis:

  • “What do I want to accomplish this week?”
  • “What are my goals for today?”
  • “Did I meet yesterday’s goals?”
  • “What kept me from meeting those goals?”
  • “What can I do differently today to help me better meet my goals?”

Stop multitasking.Is your childstuck at the kitchen table for hours trying to study while checking Facebook,texting friends, or making multiple trips to the kitchen for snacks? If so, your child is training his or her brain to dawdle. Instead, show your child how to teach his or her brain to work hard for set periods of time. One way to do this is to use a timer. Start by having your child turnoff any mobile devices and close distracting browsers. (You might also have your child finish any snacking so he or she can focus fully on studying.) Then set the timer and get started. When that timed session is over, have your child take a break. After the break, set the timer again and dive in. If at first all your child can do is fifteen minutes at a stretch, that’s fine—build up over time. The point is training your child’s brain to study, not dawdle.

Choose a couple of good study habits and practice them for a month. Experts in the formation of new and lasting habits suggest committing to two or three desired changes for a period of a month. Focusing on a few changes over the course of thirty days allows time and practice for that new change to become an integrated part of your routine. In other words, if you want help your child develop better study habits, have him pick two or three habits he wants to develop, and focus on making them an integral part of his study protocol for 30 days.

Take better notes in class.When a child sits down to study and discovers that his or her class notes are incomplete or difficult to follow, that child is simply not going to be able to accomplish what he or she needs to accomplish. Encourage your child to take complete and legible notes in class. You might start by reviewing current class notes and making suggestion on how they could be improved. Some experts say a great study tip is to rewrite class notes at home. Those notes will not only be better organized and easier to follow, the repetition will make remembering the concepts easier.

Train the skills your child’s brain uses to think and learn.Something else you can do as a parent is enroll your child in a cognitive training program. Cognitive skills are the core skills your child’s brain uses to think and learn, and when these skills are strong,learning is easier.

LearningRx is a brain training company with more than 80 centers across the United States. LearningRx uses intense mental exercise done one-on-one with a personal brain trainer to strengthen cognitive skills. These skills include attention, long and short-term memory, auditory processing, visual processing, processing speed, and logic & reasoning.

LearningRx helps children and adults of all ages. To find out if LearningRx brain training can help your child learn faster and easier, contact a LearningRx brain training center near you.

Earth to Space Cadet!

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How ADHD manifests differently in girls

Just because your daughter doesn’t “act out” in school doesn’t mean she doesn’t have attention struggles. While boys’ ADHD symptoms tend to be more “external,” girls’ symptoms tend to be more “internal.” Check out this handy infographic about ADHD:

 

Speaking of ADHD …

Over a six-year period, 5,416 children and adults (mean age 12.3) diagnosed with ADHD went through LearningRx programs. The cognitive performance of these clients was measured before and after brain training, and the largest gains were seen in IQ, auditory processing, long-term memory, and broad attention. After LearningRx brain training, IQ scores improved by an average of 15 standard points, and broad attention skills improved an average of 24 percentile points. Want more proof that your child’s brain function can improve? Read the full article with 10 scientific resources to give you hope:

https://www.learningrxblog.com/2016/09/12/theres-hope-10-pieces-of-research-that-show-your-childs-brain-function-can-improve/

Stop messing up your kids with stuff. Give them these gifts instead.

  1. Responsibility.

    By coddling children, you do them a disservice and hinder their ability to be prepared for life outside the home. Encourage them to volunteer, help around the house, get a job, and take responsibility for their actions. Teach them to balance a checkbook, keep commitments, and be punctual. Read our review of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens.

  2. Brain training. 

    Stop asking teachers to accommodate your child, and instead address the root cause of learning struggles. One-on-one brain training targets the underlying cognitive skills that help us think, learn, process, memorize, and recall information. These cognitive skills include auditory and visual processing, logic & reasoning, processing speed, attention, and memory. Read what other parents have to say about one-on-one brain training.

  3. A love of reading. 

    Does your child have a library card or access to e-books? Head to a used or new bookstore, create a local book exchange with other parents, or find out when the library is having its next paperback sale.

  4. Failure.

    Watching kids fail is hard, but how else do they learn from their mistakes? Part of the beauty of failure is that it encourages us to take risks and learn that we can survive the results, no matter what they may be. As hockey great Wayne Gretzky said, “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.”

 

 

About LearningRx
LearningRx, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the largest one-on-one brain training organization in the world. With 80 Centers in the U.S., and locations in 40 countries around the globe, LearningRx has helped more than 95,000 individuals and families sharpen their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn easier, and perform better. Their on-site programs partner every client with a personal brain trainer to keep clients engaged, accountable, and on-task—a key advantage over online-only brain exercises. Their pioneering methods have been used in clinical settings for 35 years and have been verified as beneficial in peer-reviewed research papers and journals. To learn more about LearningRx research results, programs, and their 9.6 out of 10 client satisfaction rating visit http://www.learningrx.com/. To read testimonials from real clients visit www.learningrx-reviews.com.

Are Your Child’s Learning Struggles Turning You into a Monster?

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HiResYou’re frustrated and frazzled.

You’ve been nagging at your kids for hours. Snapping. Yelling, even. You’re not happy with how you’re acting, but you can’t seem to stop the momentum, pull a U-turn and get yourself off Witchy Lane and back onto Reasonable Avenue.

Welcome to the club.

Every parent has days when life’s challenges feel… well, challenging. And if you’re the parent of a kid who is struggling, those challenges can feel absolutely overwhelming. Stress (as we all know) can bring out the worst in all of us. And if you’re feeling the stress of herding a resistant child through hours of homework, dealing with angry outbursts, or being stretched too thin, that stress can prompt you to respond in ways you know aren’t helpful.

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