May 7 is National Barrier Awareness Day

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Both visible and invisible barrier can limit the success of otherwise very capable children, teens and adults. From attention struggles and dyslexia, to dysgraphia (trouble with numbers) and memory issues, invisible barriers like weak cognitive skills can sometimes cause extreme frustration because the problem is often unknown. Kids and teens are blamed for being “lazy” or “dumb” when in fact they’re just as smart as their peers—or smarter! Adults are labeled as “unmotivated,” when the reality is that they’re struggling with a learning disability.

Worried that weak cognitive skills are making life harder than it has to be for you or someone you love? Take our free Learning Skills Discovery Survey to find out how to overcome your barriers: https://lsds.learningrx.com/

 

On the spectrum? How personal brain training can help

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April is National Autism Awareness Month

 

On the Spectrum?

Find out how we’ve helped kids, teens and adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

 

At LearningRx, we don’t diagnose autism. But plenty of students who have come to LearningRx had a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) when they started a personal brain training program with us. So why is LearningRx great for kids and adults on the spectrum? Because our personal brain training sessions are fun, challenging, structured, rewarding and encouraging! Plus, each workout session is customized to the strengths, weaknesses and goals of each individual student.

Want to learn more about our experience with kids, teens and adults on the autism spectrum? Check us out!:

https://www.learningrx.com/who-weve-helped/the-autism-spectrum/

7 Myths About the Brain that Might Surprise You

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  1. MYTH: You’re either left-brained or right-brained.
    This long-standing myth has been debunked. There is no evidence that people preferentially use one side of their brain more.2. MYTH: Cognitive decline is not impacted by choices or circumstances.
    We now understand that there are lots of things you can do that appear to fight cognitive decline: exercise, social interaction, good nutrition, brain stimulation and one-on-one brain training.

    3. MYTH: IQ cannot be changed.
    We now know the brain is “plastic,” that is, capable of changing at any age. And since IQ is simply a measurement of cognitive skills, stronger abilities translate into higher IQ.

    4. MYTH: Brain size determines intelligence.
    On average, the male brain is about 10 percent larger than the female brain, but it has nothing to do with intelligence.

    5. MYTH: Alcohol kills brain cells.
    It’s not that brain cells are being killed off by excessive alcohol consumption, it’s that the dendrites (which help cells communicate) are being damaged.

    6. MYTH: Some people are just destined to be bad at math.
    Struggles with math, called “dyscalculia,” are often caused by weak cognitive skills, which can be trained. Brain training works on the skills needed to learn, process and recall math-related information—such as visual processing, working memory and logic & reasoning.

    7. MYTH: Dyslexia is about reading letters backwards.
    Dyslexia simply means “trouble with words” and even smart kids can be dyslexic. In people with dyslexia, the weakest cognitive skills are often phonemic awareness and auditory processing, although other areas may suffer as well. Personal brain training can target and train these weak skills.