Five of the Easiest Dinner Recipes in the World

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You’re stressed. We get it, because we are too. It’s one of the reasons we love the Organic Valley ad that reminds us we’re not alone in our chaos. Plus, we get to laugh at the caricatures of moms who try just a little too hard.

At this point, most of us would just be happy to go to the bathroom without an audience, or not spend two hours a night helping our 10-year-old do Common Core math. We’re too tired to be “smarter than a fifth-grader.”

In the spirit of (over-worked, over-scheduled) sisterhood, we’ve put together a list of five of the easiest dinner recipes that ever existed in the world of culinary shortcuts. We think even Martha Stewart would be proud, despite the fact that you bought the cheese at the grocery store. (Yes, people make their own cheese. They’re the same people who get 10 hours of sleep and grow their own basil.)

The following main dish recipes should take less than 10 minutes of prep time. Serve with a bagged salad, sliced tomatoes and cucumbers in balsamic vinegar, diced bell peppers or a bowl of M&Ms. (Hey, research says chocolate is good for you now!)

Impossibly Easy Broccoli Pie

1 cup chopped broccoli

10 slices of pre-cooked bacon, crumbled or diced

1 cup shredded cheese (any flavor)

¾ cup baking mix (like Bisquick)

1 ½ cups milk

3 eggs


Directions:

  1. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Grease a pie plate.
  2. Sprinkle the broccoli, bacon and cheese into the pie plate.
  3. Mix the remaining three ingredients and pour over everything in the pie plate
  4. Cook for about 35 minutes. (Feeds 4-5.)

Variations could include yellow, red or green peppers, spinach, tomatoes, precooked sausage or chicken.

 

Set-It-And-Forget-It Slow Cooker Sausage Hoagies

8 links of fresh Italian sausage

1 (26 oz) jar of spaghetti sauce

1 green bell pepper sliced into strips

1 sliced onion

6 hoagie rolls

Directions:

  1. Put the sausage, sauce, peppers and onion in a slow cooker and mix to coat.
  2. Cook on low for 6 hours. Serve on hoagie rolls. (Feeds 6.)

 

Six-Can Chicken Pot Pie

1 (15 oz.) can of diced potatoes (drained)

1 (15 oz) can of mixed veggies (drained)

1 (10.75 oz.) can of cream of mushroom soup

2 (10 oz) cans of chicken (drained)

1 (8 oz.) can of refrigerated crescent rolls

 

Directions:

  1. Heat oven to 375.
  2. Combine the first four ingredients and pour into a pie dish.
  3. Unroll the dough and lay it across the mixture in the pie dish. Press dough to seal edges. Poke a few holes with a fork to allow for ventilation.
  4. Cook for 15 to 20 minutes. (Feeds 4 to 5.)

 

Simple Shrimp Linguine

 8 oz. linguine

4 cloves of garlic (HINT: Buy a jar of minced onion to keep in your fridge.)

4 Tbsp. butter

1 lb. peeled, deveined shrimp with tail off

1 Tbsp. lemon juice

½ cup white wine (You’re welcome!)

Directions:

  1. Cook linguine as per directions on box.
  2. In the meantime, heat the butter and garlic for 3 minutes.
  3. Add the shrimp to the butter and garlic mixture and cook for about 5 minutes, or until shrimp turns pink.
  4. Add the white wine and lemon juice to the shrimp mixture and cook for 2 minutes.
  5. Mix linguine and sauce in a big bowl and sprinkle with parmesan cheese. (Feeds 4.)

Variations: Add diced tomatoes, black olives or fresh parsley.

 


Fast Fiesta Chicken Tortillas

4 chicken breasts (raw or frozen)

1 packet Fiesta Ranch dip (dry mix by the salad dressings)

1 can drained black beans

1 can of Rotel diced tomatoes with green chilies

1 can of corn (not drained)

1 block of cream cheese

Directions:

Cook everything in a crockpot/slow cooker for 4 to 6 hours (on low). Shred and serve in tortillas or over rice. (Feeds 4 or 5.)

Do you have a “go-to” recipe that fits the bill when time is tight? Share it here for other moms to benefit.

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