Mia Tischer – From Marathon Training to Brain Training

miaA life changing realization came to Mia Tischer while she was training for a marathon. It dawned on her that if the body could be trained to enhance physical performance, why couldn’t the brain could be trained to enhance mental performance?

Shortly after that realization, Mia made the decision to partner with LearningRx, a brain training franchise, opening a brain training center in Naperville, Illinois.

“My background is in social services working with adults and children with disabilities,” Tischer said. “I have a passion for helping others who are struggling.”

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ESPN Covers Sally Francklyn’s Recovery from a TBI

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“My name is Sally Francklyn and I have a traumatic brain injury.”

In their recent coverage of well-known freeskiier Sally Francklyn, ESPN describes the young woman as a writer, skier, and much-loved personality in the freeskiing industry. Sally, who had recently landed a position as a public relations spokesperson for ski gear icons Nordica and Arc’teryx, was backcountry skiing with friends in March of 2012 when an 800-foot slide into a rock wall shattered her helmet and left her with a traumatic brain injury. Doctors were unsure if she could survive.

Eighteen months after the debilitating accident, Sally writes about her ongoing recovery, crediting rehabilitation caretakers, therapists and trainers—including her LearningRx brain trainers—for the progress she’s made so far.

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LearningRx Featured in Scientific American

Scientific-American Should teachers teach to individual learning styles?

Does research show that teaching to learning styles is effective?

Are learning styles determined by brain skills or preference?

An article in Scientific American explores these and other questions that matter to educators and parents everywhere.

The article begins with the story of Dr. Ken Gibson who, inspired by his own reading challenges, founded LearningRx, a brain training company that strengthens cognitive skills weaknesses.

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Everyday Tips for Improving Your Brain

200313650-001Did you know that living with stress, eating junk food, and embracing the sedentary life as a couch potato aren’t just bad for your mood and body, they’re bad for your brain, too? This is the reason professionals who deal with brain health often tout the benefits of exercise, eating well and reducing stress.

Your brain can benefit from other everyday things, as well. Laughter, for example, releases stress and—if you’re laughing with a friend—is a great way to connect with those around you. (Social connection is a key indicator of brain health, and experts say that social interaction helps build something called “cognitive reserve.”)

Getting plenty of sleep is also an everyday activity that is critical for brain health because it’s when you are asleep that your brain solidifies learning and makes recent memories permanent.

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The Real Cause of Dyslexia: Brain Scans Show the Story

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iStock_000021178612XSmall A common myth about dyslexia is that it’s caused by weak visual processing.

One reason this myth is so stubborn is because it sounds reasonable. After all, we use vision to read, so if reading is hard, there must be a problem with the brain’s visual system, right?

Wrong.

Scientists have known for years that the real cause of dyslexia lies in the brain’s auditory system. Kids and adults with dyslexia who confuse letters like b’s and d’s don’t do it because they see the letters as the same, but because they hear them as the same.

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