LearningRx Reviews the Game “Bop It!”

What it is: Twist it, Bop it, and Pull it in the sequence the game tells you to! Bop it has many different versions, but all of them challenge your child to focus and make quick decisions. Bop It! could be a LearningRx brain training procedure all by itself! I have purchased several Bop It!s over the years and my kids love to play and try to get high score.

Brain Benefits: Processing Speed, Sustained Attention, Selective Attention, Auditory Processing, and Sensory Motor Integration

What I love: I kept this game in my car for years so that the kids could play on the road (and yes, I know that could annoy some parents, but keeping my kids occupied has always outweighed the negatives). So if you have someone in your life who could benefit from better attention, less impulsivity, or maybe just less distraction, I highly recommend this micro version which retails under 10 bucks. I also found some “vintage” options on Amazon.com at over $100, so apparently they also appreciate in value!

What I would change: It would be great if they could create a version that used a headset so they game could be played without annoying others around them. And the price on vintage Bop It is costly.

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Buy it here.

To read more LearningRx reviews of brain-building games, toys, apps and books, visit www.learningrxreviews.com.

 

About LearningRx
LearningRx, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the largest one-on-one brain training organization in the world. With 80 Centers in the U.S., and locations in 40 countries around the globe, LearningRx has helped more than 95,000 individuals and families sharpen their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn easier, and perform better. Their on-site programs partner every client with a personal brain trainer to keep clients engaged, accountable, and on-task—a key advantage over online-only brain exercises. Their pioneering methods have been used in clinical settings for 35 years and have been verified as beneficial in peer-reviewed research papers and journals. To learn more about LearningRx research results, programs, and their 9.6 out of 10 client satisfaction rating visit http://www.learningrx.com/. To read testimonials from real clients visit www.learningrx-reviews.com.

Myths Surrounding Dyslexia

There are a lot of myths surrounding dyslexia. Perhaps one of the most common misconceptions is that dyslexia is about reversing letters. In reality, dyslexia is about weak phonemic awareness skills. Phonemic awareness and auditory processing skills are the underlying cognitive abilities to hear and remember the smallest individual units of sound in a word. The word dyslexia actually means, “poor with words or trouble with reading.” This could mean reading fluently, out loud, reading new words, and/or pronouncing words correctly.

Another myth is that dyslexia is a lifelong label. But it doesn’t need to be. Just check out our article below on what personal brain training has done to help some people labeled as dyslexic. You can also read more about treatments, myths, tools and tips related to dyslexia here.

 

About LearningRx
LearningRx, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the largest one-on-one brain training organization in the world. With 80 Centers in the U.S., and locations in 40 countries around the globe, LearningRx has helped more than 95,000 individuals and families sharpen their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn easier, and perform better. Their on-site programs partner every client with a personal brain trainer to keep clients engaged, accountable, and on-task—a key advantage over online-only brain exercises. Their pioneering methods have been used in clinical settings for 35 years and have been verified as beneficial in peer-reviewed research papers and journals. To learn more about LearningRx research results, programs, and their 9.6 out of 10 client satisfaction rating visit http://www.learningrx.com/. To read testimonials from real clients visit www.learningrx-reviews.com.

Choosing Age-Appropriate Books for Your Kids

You want your child to love reading as much as you do, but how do you find books that aren’t too mature or too boring? Here’s a quick reference guide for books by age.

Ages 3-5
What to look for: Books in this age category are typically picture books—heavy on illustrations and bright colors, often written with shorter, simpler sentences.

Ages 6-8
What to look for: Books in this age category are often referred to as “early reader” books. It’s common for these types of books to use lots of sight words or words that can be easy deciphered with the rules of phonics. The illustrations typically reflect the text in order to offer clues to more difficult words.

Ages 9-12
What to look for: This age group (or ages 8-12) is often referred to as “middle grade” readers. Books tend to run longer than for younger children—typically 30,000 to 50,000 words. The protagonist is usually between 10 and 13 and topics are frequently focused on friends and family. The voice is often third person.

Ages 13-18
What to look for: Young Adult (YA) books are longer than middle-grade books, ranging from 50,000 to 75,000 words, and typically told in first person in order to hear the main character reflect on what happens to and around them. YA books for the lower ages in the category (13 and 14), is usually free of violence, cursing and sexually explicit language, while books for the older ages in the category are more edgy.

Looking for tips to help improve your child’s reading comprehension? Check out this list of tips from LearningRx.

About LearningRx
LearningRx, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the largest one-on-one brain training organization in the world. With 80 Centers in the U.S., and locations in 40 countries around the globe, LearningRx has helped more than 95,000 individuals and families sharpen their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn easier, and perform better. Their on-site programs partner every client with a personal brain trainer to keep clients engaged, accountable, and on-task—a key advantage over online-only brain exercises. Their pioneering methods have been used in clinical settings for 35 years and have been verified as beneficial in peer-reviewed research papers and journals. To learn more about LearningRx research results, programs, and their 9.6 out of 10 client satisfaction rating visit http://www.learningrx.com/. To read testimonials from real clients visit www.learningrx.com/reviews.

LearningRx Has Launched a New Product-Review Website!

LearningRx has launched LearningRxReviews.com to showcase the best brain-boosting toys, games, books, apps and blogs. The reviews are provided by several moms from LearningRx’s national headquarters in Colorado Springs, Colorado. “One day we were discussing which toys we should include in our annual Smart Mom’s Toy Box, based on the cognitive skills they targeted,” explains Tanya Mitchell, Vice President of Research & Development for LearningRx and mother of four. “We realized that this was the kind of information other parents would want to know when choosing toys. The website was kind of an organic development, and the idea quickly expanded to include other things, like books, games, apps and even blogs. We’ve agreed to only do positive reviews, so you know anything on the website is something we like!”

Companies who would like to send their game, toy, book or app for possible review can email [email protected] for preliminary consideration. Bloggers may also submit their parenting, education or special-needs focused website. Because the focus of LearningRxReviews is primarily on brain-boosting products, preference is given to anything related to learning struggles, special needs, cognitive skills, etc.

Do you have a product you’d like us to review? Leave a comment below!

Four Things You Might Not Know About ADHD

Although you probably know that ADHD is about attention struggles, there’s a lot more to this common learning disability. Here are four things that might surprise you.

1. ADHD is actually rooted in clusters of weak cognitive skills. Most of the students who came to LearningRx with a diagnosis of ADHD had, in addition to weak broad attention skills, weak long-term memory, processing speed and working memory.

Over a six-year period, LearningRx had 5,416 children and adults come in with the diagnosis of ADHD. LearningRx measured the cognitive performance of these clients before and after one-on-one brain training, and the largest gains were seen in IQ, auditory processing, long-term memory and broad attention. After LearningRx brain training, IQ scores improved by an average of 15 standard points, and broad attention skills improved an average of 24 percentile points.

The full results of the study can be found on page 25 of LearningRx’s 48-page 2016 edition of “Client Outcomes and Research Results.”

2. There are three types of attention. ADHD is now the generally accepted umbrella term for the three types of ADHD, including what used to be generally referred to as ADD. The three forms of ADHD are:

  • Inattentive Type – people with this disorder have trouble focusing, but they are not overly active and usually don’t display disruptive behavior (formerly called ADD).
  • Hyperactive/Impulsive Type – people are fidgety and can’t control their impulses, but they are better able to pay attention.
  • Combined Type – applies to people with poor attention, impulsiveness, and hyperactivity.

An attention deficit could mean one, two, or all three types of attention: sustained, selective, and divided. Sustained attention is the cognitive skill that allows your child to stay on task for a long period of time. Selective attention is the cognitive skill that prevents the child from being easily distracted. Divided attention allows them to do more than one task at a time.

3. ADHD manifests differently in girls. When people think of ADHD, they often think of boys bouncing off the walls. While hyperactivity is a common symptom of attention struggles—especially among boys—it’s often accompanied by things like impulsivity and an inability to multitask. But for girls, ADHD tends to manifest differently, often as inattentiveness and disorganization. Because these symptoms aren’t as disruptive to class, ADHD in girls is often missed.

4. Unaddressed ADHD can lead to other issues. Here are some of the ways ADHD can impact life throughout school, college, and even into adulthood:

  • Low self-esteem
  • Poor grades
  • Difficulty getting into college
  • Anxiety and/or depression
  • Significant time-management challenges
  • Difficulty managing money
  • Chronic disorganization

If you’re concerned that your child may have a cognitive skills weakness, take our free online survey at  http://lsds.learningrx.com/.

 

About LearningRx
LearningRx, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the largest one-on-one brain training organization in the world. With 80 Centers in the U.S., and locations in 40 countries around the globe, LearningRx has helped more than 95,000 individuals and families sharpen their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn easier, and perform better. Their on-site programs partner every client with a personal brain trainer to keep clients engaged, accountable, and on-task—a key advantage over online-only brain exercises. Their pioneering methods have been used in clinical settings for 35 years and have been verified as beneficial in peer-reviewed research papers and journals. To learn more about LearningRx research results, programs, and their 9.6 out of 10 client satisfaction rating visit http://www.learningrx.com/. To read testimonials from real clients visit www.learningrx-reviews.com.