Category: Sleep

Standardized Tests: 4 factors within your control

There are lots of factors that contribute to test performance results. Here are four of the most common, with tips on how to help:

  1. Focus on Nutrition: Children’s brains burn through energy very rapidly and needs consistent fuel. Feed children meals balanced with healthy carbohydrates, protein and fat. Look for ways to incorporate healthy “brain foods” into your family’s diet: beans, olive oil, walnuts, blueberries and omega-3-rich fish like wild salmon, mackerel and tuna.
  2. Manage Anxiety: Whether genetic or situational, extreme worry can cause physical responses in the body that hinder a child from performing well on a test. Teach your child relaxation techniques like meditation, deep breathing, or visualization.
  3. Help Your Child Get Enough Sleep: Sleep deprivation is known to decrease attentiveness,  response time, short-term memory, and performance.  Here’s a handy chart to help you determine what time your child should go to bed.
  4. Train Your Child’s Cognitive skills: While knowledge is the information that is acquire—such as math formulas—cognitive skills are the tools the brain needs to learn, understand, and apply to those math formulas. When taking timed tests, one of the most important cognitive skills is processing speed. More than 90% of students who completed the ReadRx program showed improvement on state reading achievement tests. Enroll your child in a one-on-one cognitive skills training program to target the fundamental learning tools needed to excel on all types of timed tests.

 

About LearningRx
LearningRx, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the largest one-on-one brain training organization in the world. With 80 Centers in the U.S., and locations in 40 countries around the globe, LearningRx has helped more than 95,000 individuals and families sharpen their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn easier, and perform better. Their on-site programs partner every client with a personal brain trainer to keep clients engaged, accountable, and on-task—a key advantage over online-only brain exercises. Their pioneering methods have been used in clinical settings for 35 years and have been verified as beneficial in peer-reviewed research papers and journals. To learn more about LearningRx research results, programs, and their 9.6 out of 10 client satisfaction rating visit http://www.learningrx.com/. To read testimonials from real clients visit www.learningrx-reviews.com.

The Negative Effects of Electronics

53411926_thumbnailWhile past studies have linked televisions in children’s rooms to a reduction in sleep, until recently few studies examined how kids’ sleeping patterns are impacted by smaller electronics such as smart phones and tablets.

Studies on the impact of small electronics and quality of sleep are emerging now, and the findings are not good.

In fact, in one recent study, researchers found that children who slept near small screens—including those on phones and other portable electronics—reported about 21 minutes less sleep than peers who slept in electronic-free bedrooms. The kids who slept near electronics also reported feeling more sleep deprived.

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Go Ahead. Sleep on it.

iStock_000013131759_LargeWhat do Albert Einstein, Lady Gaga and George W. Bush have in common? Nope, not their fashion sense. The answer is …their naps. Each of these famous people is known for famously protecting their daytime dozing. Dozens of other napping notables join their ranks. Lyndon Johnson conducted presidential meetings while resting in his bed. Bill Clinton once nodded off during a Mets baseball and a memorial service for Martin Luther King Jr.

Why do we love our naps? Well, one reason is rooted in our biology. Many people’s inner clock slows between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m., also known as the “postprandial dip.” Many cultures actually honor this natural energy lull with the allowable afternoon siesta, when shops close and people doze.

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