Category: Resources for Teachers

Myths Surrounding Dyslexia

There are a lot of myths surrounding dyslexia. Perhaps one of the most common misconceptions is that dyslexia is about reversing letters. In reality, dyslexia is about weak phonemic awareness skills. Phonemic awareness and auditory processing skills are the underlying cognitive abilities to hear and remember the smallest individual units of sound in a word. The word dyslexia actually means, “poor with words or trouble with reading.” This could mean reading fluently, out loud, reading new words, and/or pronouncing words correctly.

Another myth is that dyslexia is a lifelong label. But it doesn’t need to be. Just check out our article below on what personal brain training has done to help some people labeled as dyslexic. You can also read more about treatments, myths, tools and tips related to dyslexia here.

 

About LearningRx
LearningRx, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the largest one-on-one brain training organization in the world. With 80 Centers in the U.S., and locations in 40 countries around the globe, LearningRx has helped more than 95,000 individuals and families sharpen their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn easier, and perform better. Their on-site programs partner every client with a personal brain trainer to keep clients engaged, accountable, and on-task—a key advantage over online-only brain exercises. Their pioneering methods have been used in clinical settings for 35 years and have been verified as beneficial in peer-reviewed research papers and journals. To learn more about LearningRx research results, programs, and their 9.6 out of 10 client satisfaction rating visit http://www.learningrx.com/. To read testimonials from real clients visit www.learningrx-reviews.com.

Train Your Brain to Listen: Five Fun Activities for Kids

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We hear sounds (like birds chirping) and voices (like a teacher giving a homework assignment), but do we really listen?

Carole Elkeles is a retired educator who believes that if kids know how to listen, both school and life will be easier to handle. She says, “Listening skills are learned…and listening is basic for communicating, learning, thinking and acquiring awareness of the world around you.

Learning to listen can help increase the quality of relationships, reduce misunderstandings and improve productivity in the classroom or the workplace.

In her article “Listening Games and Activities,” Elkeles says that the skill of listening can be honed in about five minutes a day. It starts with knowing what types of listening skills need to be developed. Here are the five skills:

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