Category: Reading

What the Heck Is Auditory Processing Disorder?

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Find out what Auditory Processing Disorder is, and the signs of it.

Don’t be fooled by the word “auditory.” APD isn’t a hearing problem; it’s about how well the brain is processing the sounds that the ear receives. Find out the signs, assessments, and options for children, teens, and adults with APD.

 Signs of Auditory Processing Disorder

Auditory Processing Disorder can easily be misdiagnosed because the resulting struggles may be attributed to other causes. For example, a child who is struggling to understand verbal directions in class may struggle with grades, appear to be goofing off, act out in frustration, withdraw from interaction, or experience low self-esteem from the feeling that everyone else in the class “gets it” better than he or she does. At first glance, a teacher or parent might assume that this child is unmotivated, has ADHD, has behavior issues, is introverted, etc.

Children and adults with an auditory processing disorder can also struggle with communication: confusing words with similar sounds, or mispronouncing words altogether. They can also appear weak in social skills: showing a lack of confidence, not grasping verbal directions, not being able to hear and respond appropriately to content of conversations, etc. A child or adult with APD may especially struggle when in a noisy environment, or appear to have poor hearing because they frequently ask for things to be repeated or clarified.

As mentioned, some of these behaviors can also be exhibited, for example, by people with attention deficits who don’t grasp what they are hearing the first time around because they are distracted. Because of this, diagnosing APD cannot be done by looking at a list of symptoms. It must be done by an audiologist who administers a series of assessments in a sound-treated room.

Options for people with Auditory Processing Disorder

If someone is diagnosed with APD, there are three main courses of action. The first is making accommodations in the environment, for example, creating a quieter place to work or study. The second course of action involves developing other resources to compensate for the auditory processing deficit. This might include strengthening other skills, like attention, or learning active-listening techniques.

The third course of action involves taking efforts to strengthen the weak auditory processing skills themselves.

LearningRx, a brain training company, does not diagnose or treat any medical conditions, including APD. What they provide are mental workouts that strengthen cognitive skills, including auditory processing skills.

In fact, the company’s unique approach—which puts every client with his or her personal brain trainer for fun, intense mental workouts—has shown dramatic results for past clients with auditory processing weaknesses.

LearningRx measures the cognitive skills of all incoming clients, and has found that it is common to find low auditory processing skills among clients with diagnoses. The good news is that auditory processing is also the skill in which, among this group, we see the largest gains after the completion of a LearningRx brain training program.

The following chart shows the average improvements of more than 12,000 children and adults who came to LearningRx with some kind of diagnosis, including ADHD, dyslexia, TBI, and more. You can see that, after brain training, auditory processing improved by an average of 14 standard points among clients with ADHD, memory loss, dyslexia, and autism. (Standard points, by the way, rank where a person is performing in relation to their peers, and are measured on a 100-point scale from 50 to 150, with 100 considered “average.”)

Auditory processing improved by even more—an average of 15 standard points—for people with learning disabilities, TBI, and speech and language issues. 

Start with a comprehensive Cognitive Skills Assessment

LearningRx offers a comprehensive Cognitive Skills Assessment that identifies weaknesses in the following cognitive skills: attention, long-term memory, short-term memory, auditory processing, visual processing, logic & reasoning, and processing speed. The assessment is not administered for the purpose of diagnosis, but for pinpointing cognitive weaknesses that can be targeted and strengthened through brain training. It’s a good place to start because, as mentioned, the symptoms of weak auditory processing skills may be shared by other conditions.

Typically, LearningRx brain training programs consist of about five hours of training a week, for a period of 12 to 32 weeks. Families often find that going through a LearningRx program once produces the results they are seeking, and that ongoing training is not necessary.

To schedule a comprehensive Cognitive Skills Assessment—which is reasonably priced and takes about an hour—contact a LearningRx Center near you.

Myths Surrounding Dyslexia

There are a lot of myths surrounding dyslexia. Perhaps one of the most common misconceptions is that dyslexia is about reversing letters. In reality, dyslexia is about weak phonemic awareness skills. Phonemic awareness and auditory processing skills are the underlying cognitive abilities to hear and remember the smallest individual units of sound in a word. The word dyslexia actually means, “poor with words or trouble with reading.” This could mean reading fluently, out loud, reading new words, and/or pronouncing words correctly.

Another myth is that dyslexia is a lifelong label. But it doesn’t need to be. Just check out our article below on what personal brain training has done to help some people labeled as dyslexic. You can also read more about treatments, myths, tools and tips related to dyslexia here.

 

About LearningRx
LearningRx, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the largest one-on-one brain training organization in the world. With 80 Centers in the U.S., and locations in 40 countries around the globe, LearningRx has helped more than 95,000 individuals and families sharpen their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn easier, and perform better. Their on-site programs partner every client with a personal brain trainer to keep clients engaged, accountable, and on-task—a key advantage over online-only brain exercises. Their pioneering methods have been used in clinical settings for 35 years and have been verified as beneficial in peer-reviewed research papers and journals. To learn more about LearningRx research results, programs, and their 9.6 out of 10 client satisfaction rating visit http://www.learningrx.com/. To read testimonials from real clients visit www.learningrx-reviews.com.

Reading Struggles? Here’s 4 Tips for Improving Standardized Reading Achievement Test Scores

Just because your child is smart doesn’t mean they’re going to ace the ACTs or SATs. There are lots of factors that contribute to test performance results. Here are four of the most important with tips on how to help.

Poor nutrition

To keep cognitive function at its peak, the brain needs “good” fuel. Add the wrong kind of fuel (like processed sugars) or not enough fuel and it’s not going to perform well. Children’s brains burn through energy very, very rapidly and needs consistent fuel. Feed them meals balanced with a portion of healthy carbohydrates, protein and fat. Look for ways to incorporate healthy “brain foods” into your family’s diet on a regular basis. Beans, olive oil, walnuts, blueberries and omega-3-rich fish like wild salmon, mackerel and tuna.

Anxiety

Whether genetic or situational, extreme worry can cause physical responses in the body that hinder a child from performing well on a test. Teach your child relaxation techniques like meditation, deep breathing or visualization (where they picture themselves doing well on a test). You can also go over material with a child the night before a test to help them feel prepared.

Lack of sleep

Sleep deprivation is known to decrease everything from attentiveness and response time to short-term memory and performance. The Nemours Foundation recommends 10 hours of sleep for kids 6 to 9; 9 hours for 10- to 12-year-olds; and 8 to 9.5 for teens. Here’s a handy chart to help you determine what time your child should go to bed.

Work to create relaxing routines (warm bath, time to unwind, reading) and try to stick to a schedule. Encourage your child or teen to go to bed at the same time each night and avoid foods that contain sugar, food dyes or caffeine.

Weak cognitive skills

Standardized tests don’t just quiz kids on what information they know; they also require them to have strong cognitive skills.

While knowledge is the information you acquire and memorize—such as math formulas—cognitive skills are the tools you need to learn, understand and apply to those math formulas. They include auditory and visual processing, comprehension, logic and reasoning, processing speed, memory and attention. When taking timed tests, one of the most important cognitive skills is processing speed.

reading-achievement-graphA study of LearningRx’s (www.LearningRx.com) ReadRx personal brain training program results found that after training, the group of students made statistically significant gains on tests of World Attack, Spelling Sounds, Sound Awareness and Passage Comprehension. Additionally, 91% of students who completed the ReadRx program showed improvement on state reading achievement tests. The results have been published in LearningRx’s 48-page 2016 edition of “Client Outcomes and Research Results,” which can be downloaded here: http://www.learningrx.com/our-programs/learningrx-results/. 

 Enroll your child in a one-on-one cognitive skills training program to target the fundamental learning tools needed to excel on all types of timed tests. Visit www.LearningRx.com to learn more.

 

About LearningRx
LearningRx, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the largest one-on-one brain training organization in the world. With 80 Centers in the U.S., and locations in 40 countries around the globe, LearningRx has helped more than 95,000 individuals and families sharpen their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn easier, and perform better. Their on-site programs partner every client with a personal brain trainer to keep clients engaged, accountable, and on-task—a key advantage over online-only brain exercises. Their pioneering methods have been used in clinical settings for 35 years and have been verified as beneficial in peer-reviewed research papers and journals. To learn more about LearningRx research results, programs, and their 9.6 out of 10 client satisfaction rating visit http://www.learningrx.com/. To read testimonials from real clients visit www.learningrx-reviews.com.

ComprehendRx

ComprehendRx

We read for meaning. But for some kids (and even adults), reading comprehension is a struggle.

For some, decoding the words on the page takes so much energy that fully comprehending the meaning of the words takes a back seat. For others, the meaning is grasped but not retained. In fact, research by the National Assessment of Educational Progress shows that one out of four eighth grade students, when asked to read age-appropriate material, can’t understand what they just read.

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What Would Dr. Seuss Say?

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It’s Read Across America Day – a day set aside to encourage every person in America to read or be read to for fun. This annual nationwide observance coincides with the birthday of Dr. Seuss, the American writer best known for creating children’s books and inspiring the love of reading in four generations of kids.

The beloved Doc died in 1991, six years before the first Read Across America Day, and while he would most likely have been tickled with the event, the state of reading in America may have him rolling over in his grave.

A 2007 report by the National Endowment of the Arts (NEA), shows reading literacy has dropped since Seuss was alive. To Read or Not To Read: A Question of National Consequence gathered statistics from more than 40 studies on the reading skills and habits of Americans of all ages. The report unveiled trends that Americans are reading less, reading less well, and graduating from school less prepared.

According to the official website of Dr. Seuss, a few weeks before his death, when asked if there was anything he might have left unsaid, Seuss replied, “Any message or slogan? Whenever things go a bit sour in a job I’m doing, I always tell myself, ‘You can do better than this.’ The best slogan I can think of to leave with the kids of the U.S.A. would be ‘We can…and we’ve got to…do better than this.”

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