Category: Parenting

Can You Hear Me Now?

Interpreting what your kid’s teacher says

As you head into conferences, or any time you talk to your child’s teacher, listen for these red flag phrases:

“I know he’s smart, but …”

  • His work doesn’t show it.
  • He makes sloppy mistakes.

This phrase is a good indicator that several cognitive skills are very strong, while others are deficient and causing a bottleneck for learning.

“He’s below grade level in reading.”

Studies show 85 percent of all learning-to-read problems are caused by weak phonemic awareness skills, which give us the ability to hear, blend, unglue, and manipulate the smallest sounds in a word. Reading struggles can also be caused or compounded by deficiencies in visual processing, memory, attention, and processing speed.

“He takes a long time to…”

  • Finish schoolwork.
  • Answer questions.

Some kids take longer because they’re perfectionists, but weak cognitive skills are generally to blame if a child is always the last student done with an assignment, can’t seem to complete tasks, or takes hours to wrap up standard homework loads.

If you hear any of the red flag phrases at conference time, or if the teacher says your child has several of the above signs, it may be time to schedule a cognitive skills assessment. After determining which skills are weak, you can focus on the most effective way to target and train those skills.

 

About LearningRx
LearningRx, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the largest one-on-one brain training organization in the world. With 80 Centers in the U.S., and locations in 40 countries around the globe, LearningRx has helped more than 95,000 individuals and families sharpen their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn easier, and perform better. Their on-site programs partner every client with a personal brain trainer to keep clients engaged, accountable, and on-task—a key advantage over online-only brain exercises. Their pioneering methods have been used in clinical settings for 35 years and have been verified as beneficial in peer-reviewed research papers and journals. To learn more about LearningRx research results, programs, and their 9.6 out of 10 client satisfaction rating visit http://www.learningrx.com/. To read testimonials from real clients visit www.learningrx-reviews.com.

Stop messing up your kids with stuff. Give them these gifts instead.

  1. Responsibility.

    By coddling children, you do them a disservice and hinder their ability to be prepared for life outside the home. Encourage them to volunteer, help around the house, get a job, and take responsibility for their actions. Teach them to balance a checkbook, keep commitments, and be punctual. Read our review of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens.

  2. Brain training. 

    Stop asking teachers to accommodate your child, and instead address the root cause of learning struggles. One-on-one brain training targets the underlying cognitive skills that help us think, learn, process, memorize, and recall information. These cognitive skills include auditory and visual processing, logic & reasoning, processing speed, attention, and memory. Read what other parents have to say about one-on-one brain training.

  3. A love of reading. 

    Does your child have a library card or access to e-books? Head to a used or new bookstore, create a local book exchange with other parents, or find out when the library is having its next paperback sale.

  4. Failure.

    Watching kids fail is hard, but how else do they learn from their mistakes? Part of the beauty of failure is that it encourages us to take risks and learn that we can survive the results, no matter what they may be. As hockey great Wayne Gretzky said, “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.”

 

 

About LearningRx
LearningRx, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the largest one-on-one brain training organization in the world. With 80 Centers in the U.S., and locations in 40 countries around the globe, LearningRx has helped more than 95,000 individuals and families sharpen their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn easier, and perform better. Their on-site programs partner every client with a personal brain trainer to keep clients engaged, accountable, and on-task—a key advantage over online-only brain exercises. Their pioneering methods have been used in clinical settings for 35 years and have been verified as beneficial in peer-reviewed research papers and journals. To learn more about LearningRx research results, programs, and their 9.6 out of 10 client satisfaction rating visit http://www.learningrx.com/. To read testimonials from real clients visit www.learningrx-reviews.com.

5 Things That Are Draining Your Energy

  1.  Too much technology.

    Try a technology-free night and see how you feel. Put your phone away for the night so you’re not tempted to check it first thing in the morning. What does the next day feel like after a night with no TV, computer or phone?

  1. Not enough help around the house.

    If you can swing it, pay for a cleaning person to come in once a week just for a couple hours. Or create a chore chart for your family so they stop treating YOU like the maid. Here’s a short, funny video you can show them to get your point across.

  1. Homework struggles.

    If you’re spending too much of your night helping a struggling learner, consider enrolling them in LearningRx personal brain training. Learn about other kids’ experiences with LearningRx.

  1. Too much on your schedule.

    First, practice saying “no.” Second, look for ways to split commitments with other parents (e.g., driving to soccer practice). Finally, color code your family calendar with red being priority (e.g., doctor, dentist), green being fun (e.g., family movie night) and yellow being everything else. Then step back and see which colors dominate.

  1. Not enough sleep.

    Focus on the wind down with a warm bath, sleep-inducing tea and a good book. Keep a notepad next to your bed to write down things that keep your head swirling and commit to letting them go until the next day.

 

 

About LearningRx
LearningRx, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the largest one-on-one brain training organization in the world. With 80 Centers in the U.S., and locations in 40 countries around the globe, LearningRx has helped more than 95,000 individuals and families sharpen their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn easier, and perform better. Their on-site programs partner every client with a personal brain trainer to keep clients engaged, accountable, and on-task—a key advantage over online-only brain exercises. Their pioneering methods have been used in clinical settings for 35 years and have been verified as beneficial in peer-reviewed research papers and journals. To learn more about LearningRx research results, programs, and their 9.6 out of 10 client satisfaction rating visit http://www.learningrx.com/. To read testimonials from real clients visit www.learningrx-reviews.com.

Homework and the Mommy Meltdown

For kids with learning struggles, the burden of understanding geometry or studying for spelling tests is as much our pain as theirs. If daily homework battles are driving you crazy, check out tips to improve the experience:

  1. Prepare mentally. Decide ahead of time what kind of attitude you’re going to embrace, and how you’re going to respond if things get tense or difficult.
  2. Do a quick self-check. Before helping your child with his or her homework, take a quick self-check. Are you tired? Hungry? Frustrated about something that happened earlier in your day? If so, take a few minutes to eat a snack, catch a power nap, or do whatever you need to do to decompress.
  3. Have what you need on hand. Homework takes a significant time commitment as it is. Don’t add to that time by having to spend an hour looking for the slide rule, or having to drop everything and run to the store for poster board.
  4. Practice familiar cues. Some kids thrive on routine, and you can create fun habits that can help your child’s brain take familiar paths to settling down and being productive.
  5. Try a new setting. Routine is good, but sometimes it can also help to shake things up a bit, either as a reward for a productive week, or to see if your child actually studies better in a different setting.
  6. Exercise physically before studying. See what happens if you insist he or she plays outside for an hour before starting homework. Studies show that physical exercise improves thinking and concentration, in the long run and immediately as well.
  7. Eat brain-healthy snacks. Think good fats, lean protein, and complex carbs. Good fats can be found in omega-3 oils from fish, nuts, seeds, and dark leafy greens. Lean protein can be found in raw almonds, baked chicken, and organic plain yogurt with fresh fruit. Complex carbs can be found in whole grain tortillas, brown rice, and sweet potatoes.

LearningRx Reviews “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens”

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What it is: In his book, “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens,” Sean Covey provides teens (and their parents J) with a step-by-step guide on how to improve their self-image, make good decisions, set and achieve goals, talk to their parents, and much more. The audio version, available at audible.com, includes commentary from teens and their real-life applications of these principles.

Brain Benefitsplanning, logic & reasoning, communication

What I love: I always look forward to our road trips and car time so that as a family we can listen to books. In the past we have listened to some classics, as well as books that were required reading for their school. Every once in a while, I like to sneak in a little inspirational, self-improvement-type book.

My husband and four kids listened to this book last summer on the drive to Yellowstone.  Although only two of my kids are teenagers, my younger two kids also took away some gems. After each chapter we would stop the recording and discuss their thoughts on each habit and how his ideas might be helpful in their life. Our discussions were lively and helped us to talk our kids about difficult and sometimes painful situations and gave us great insight into their thought processes. It was also fun to hear my 5-year-old tell my other kids, who were complaining at the time, that they needed to be more proactive!

What I would change: Since we listed to the audio version of the book, there were times that the narrator’s voice was a little nasaly (and to my kids, sometimes annoying).

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Buy it here.

To read more LearningRx reviews of brain-building games, toys, apps and books, visit www.learningrxreviews.com.