Category: Dyslexia

“This is Too Hard!” 5 ways to help a child with a learning disability

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It’s painful watching your child struggle in school, but there are things you can do to help. Find out how to turn “This is too hard!” to “I can do this!” with these 5 tips.

  1. Remind them that even very smart kids can have a learning disability; it’s not necessary an indication of intelligence. Explain that Albert Einstein had ADHD and Thomas Edison had dyslexia and look how brilliant they were!
  2. Enroll them in personal brain training. Most learning disabilities are due to weak cognitive skills. If weak cognitive skills are, indeed, causing your child to struggle, that’s actually good news because there is something you can do about it: weak skills can be strengthened. One-on-one brain training provides a way to strengthen the core skills the brain uses to think and perform. And because every brain training program is customized, even extremely smart kids can benefit from brain training. LearningRx brain trainers work with clients of all ages about five hours a week, for 12 to 32 weeks, depending on the program. Workout sessions are customized to meet the individual objectives—and strengthen weak skills—unique to each client. And because workouts consist of game-like mental exercises, clients of all ages typically enjoy the experience.
  3. Make decisions based on facts, not assumptions. Many parents mistakenly believe that learning disabilities, such as dyslexia, are a lifelong label, or that some kids are genetically destined to always be bad at math. These are myths that can keep parents from seeking out help.
  4.  Don’t give up! At LearningRx, we hear time and time again about parents who put their child in tutoring with little to no results. That’s because tutoring is a great solution when there is an identifiable, external reason that a student did not grasp classroom content the first time it was presented in class. Perhaps a child was sick or on vacation, or a relocation in the middle of the school year created a gap in curriculum. It’s also possible that something (like an extended illness or pregnancy) impacted the consistent delivery of material. The point is, when something has interfered with the delivery of content to your child, hiring a tutor to reteach that content makes sense. On the other hand, brain training does not reteach missed content, but instead exercises and strengthens the basic skills the brain uses to think, learn, and perform. In other words, brain training improves the way the brain grasps information the first time it is presented. So, if your child is struggling in more than one class, or struggling year after year, weak cognitive skills may be to blame. And if they are, brain training can strengthen those skills.
  5. Start with baby steps. You don’t need to figure everything out at once. Begin by taking one or two small actions to get the ball rolling. Talk to your child’s teacher about specific issues your child displays, such as speaking out of turn, difficulty staying organized or taking longer than most students to complete tests. Call your local LearningRx to schedule a cognitive skills assessment. The one-hour assessment will provide a detailed look at your child’s individual cognitive strengths and weaknesses, and will give you invaluable information you need in order to decide on the next best step to help your child.

It’s All Greek to Me! Understanding Specific Reading Comprehension Deficits (S-RCD) in Children

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Specific Reading Comprehension Deficits (S-RCD) is like being able to read a foreign language — because you know how the words are pronounced — but having no idea what the words mean. Research shows that there’s even a difference in the brain of someone with S-RCD, which can be seen with neuroimaging. A recent study found that while children with dyslexia showed abnormalities in the occipital temporal cortex (the area of the brain associated with recognizing words on a page), children with S-RCD had abnormalities in the region associated with memory.

 

There’s a lot of research on dyslexia, which simply means “trouble with words.” But there’s not a lot about S-RCD, or Specific Reading Comprehension Deficits. Where dyslexia is about reading the words, S-RCD is about understanding them. It’s like being able to read a foreign language— because you know how the words are pronounced—but having no idea what the words mean.

S-RCD and a child’s brain

Research shows that there’s even a difference in the brain of someone with S-RCD, which can be seen with neuroimaging. According to a recent study collaboration between Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College of Education and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine/Kennedy Krieger Institute, children with dyslexia showed abnormalities in the occipital temporal cortex (the area associated with recognizing words on a page). But in children with S-RCD, the abnormalities are instead in the region associated with memory.

In a previous study, neuroscientists found that, compared to children with word recognition deficits, those with S-RCD performed more poorly on tests of planning and spatial memory.

This is the reason it is common for S-RCD not to be recognized until about third or fourth grade, when teaching shifts from decoding to comprehension.

An exercise to improve reading comprehension

Obviously, poor reading comprehension can spill over into many aspects of life, including homework, testing, college prep exams, leisure reading and, and more. And comprehension struggles affect not only grades in English class, but in all subjects. Just imagine reading written math problems (or answers) but not understanding the question or directions on how to arrive at the correct answer!

For anyone who is looking to help a child or students increase reading comprehension, try this fun approach called “Somebody Wanted But So” (SWBS). Label four columns with the following: Somebody (characterization), Wanted (plot events), But (problem/conflict) and So (resolution). Have the child or student fill out the columns as they read. Here’s a simple example:

Somebody: Wanted: But: So:
Cinderella wanted to stay at the but her carriage so she ran out
ball with the prince would turn into a
pumpkin at midnight

Brain training improves memory, logic, and more

Another way to improve reading comprehension is through a form of cognitive training call one-on-one brain training. LearningRx specializes in one-on-one brain training as a way of strengthening cognitive skills such as: memory, attention, logic & reasoning, and more.

LearningRx trains cognitive skills through game-like exercises that are both fun and challenging—and we do it with a unique personal trainer approach.

Myths Surrounding Dyslexia

There are a lot of myths surrounding dyslexia. Perhaps one of the most common misconceptions is that dyslexia is about reversing letters. In reality, dyslexia is about weak phonemic awareness skills. Phonemic awareness and auditory processing skills are the underlying cognitive abilities to hear and remember the smallest individual units of sound in a word. The word dyslexia actually means, “poor with words or trouble with reading.” This could mean reading fluently, out loud, reading new words, and/or pronouncing words correctly.

Another myth is that dyslexia is a lifelong label. But it doesn’t need to be. Just check out our article below on what personal brain training has done to help some people labeled as dyslexic. You can also read more about treatments, myths, tools and tips related to dyslexia here.

 

About LearningRx
LearningRx, headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado, is the largest one-on-one brain training organization in the world. With 80 Centers in the U.S., and locations in 40 countries around the globe, LearningRx has helped more than 95,000 individuals and families sharpen their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn easier, and perform better. Their on-site programs partner every client with a personal brain trainer to keep clients engaged, accountable, and on-task—a key advantage over online-only brain exercises. Their pioneering methods have been used in clinical settings for 35 years and have been verified as beneficial in peer-reviewed research papers and journals. To learn more about LearningRx research results, programs, and their 9.6 out of 10 client satisfaction rating visit http://www.learningrx.com/. To read testimonials from real clients visit www.learningrx-reviews.com.

ComprehendRx

ComprehendRx

We read for meaning. But for some kids (and even adults), reading comprehension is a struggle.

For some, decoding the words on the page takes so much energy that fully comprehending the meaning of the words takes a back seat. For others, the meaning is grasped but not retained. In fact, research by the National Assessment of Educational Progress shows that one out of four eighth grade students, when asked to read age-appropriate material, can’t understand what they just read.

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The Real Cause of Dyslexia: Brain Scans Show the Story

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iStock_000021178612XSmall A common myth about dyslexia is that it’s caused by weak visual processing.

One reason this myth is so stubborn is because it sounds reasonable. After all, we use vision to read, so if reading is hard, there must be a problem with the brain’s visual system, right?

Wrong.

Scientists have known for years that the real cause of dyslexia lies in the brain’s auditory system. Kids and adults with dyslexia who confuse letters like b’s and d’s don’t do it because they see the letters as the same, but because they hear them as the same.

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