Category: Confidence

“This is Too Hard!” 5 ways to help a child with a learning disability

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It’s painful watching your child struggle in school, but there are things you can do to help. Find out how to turn “This is too hard!” to “I can do this!” with these 5 tips.

  1. Remind them that even very smart kids can have a learning disability; it’s not necessary an indication of intelligence. Explain that Albert Einstein had ADHD and Thomas Edison had dyslexia and look how brilliant they were!
  2. Enroll them in personal brain training. Most learning disabilities are due to weak cognitive skills. If weak cognitive skills are, indeed, causing your child to struggle, that’s actually good news because there is something you can do about it: weak skills can be strengthened. One-on-one brain training provides a way to strengthen the core skills the brain uses to think and perform. And because every brain training program is customized, even extremely smart kids can benefit from brain training. LearningRx brain trainers work with clients of all ages about five hours a week, for 12 to 32 weeks, depending on the program. Workout sessions are customized to meet the individual objectives—and strengthen weak skills—unique to each client. And because workouts consist of game-like mental exercises, clients of all ages typically enjoy the experience.
  3. Make decisions based on facts, not assumptions. Many parents mistakenly believe that learning disabilities, such as dyslexia, are a lifelong label, or that some kids are genetically destined to always be bad at math. These are myths that can keep parents from seeking out help.
  4.  Don’t give up! At LearningRx, we hear time and time again about parents who put their child in tutoring with little to no results. That’s because tutoring is a great solution when there is an identifiable, external reason that a student did not grasp classroom content the first time it was presented in class. Perhaps a child was sick or on vacation, or a relocation in the middle of the school year created a gap in curriculum. It’s also possible that something (like an extended illness or pregnancy) impacted the consistent delivery of material. The point is, when something has interfered with the delivery of content to your child, hiring a tutor to reteach that content makes sense. On the other hand, brain training does not reteach missed content, but instead exercises and strengthens the basic skills the brain uses to think, learn, and perform. In other words, brain training improves the way the brain grasps information the first time it is presented. So, if your child is struggling in more than one class, or struggling year after year, weak cognitive skills may be to blame. And if they are, brain training can strengthen those skills.
  5. Start with baby steps. You don’t need to figure everything out at once. Begin by taking one or two small actions to get the ball rolling. Talk to your child’s teacher about specific issues your child displays, such as speaking out of turn, difficulty staying organized or taking longer than most students to complete tests. Call your local LearningRx to schedule a cognitive skills assessment. The one-hour assessment will provide a detailed look at your child’s individual cognitive strengths and weaknesses, and will give you invaluable information you need in order to decide on the next best step to help your child.

Sand Art Activities to Help Children Cope with Feelings

Sand Image1By Guest Blogger Kim Peterson, MA, LPC-S, RPT

Understanding feelings, being able to identify our feelings, and sharing our feelings are important for a person’s emotional and psychological wellness. Happy, sad, angry, proud, afraid… these are all normal feelings. As a psychotherapist, I spend most of my day helping others sort out and cope with these feelings, and as a mom, I take time to teach these skills to my children as well. I’ve written before about the impact of sand play in a child’s life, but I especially love the idea of using colored sand as a tool for teaching and coping with feelings.

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5 Ways Keeping a Journal Can Help You Be a Better Parent

Blog1 By Guest Blogger Karen Linamen Bouchard

You want to be the best parent that you can be. What if something as simple as keeping a journal could help you be a more effective parent?

I happen to be a writer, so it makes sense that I’m enamored with the power of the pen. But it’s not just me! In fact, the myriad benefits of journaling have been well documented by study after study.

Let’s take a look at a few of the perks of journaling, starting with something every parent can appreciate.

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The Key To Success

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TEDResearch shows that kids with lots of grit (and less mental ability) are more successful than kids with lots of mental ability (but less grit). In this video, researcher and psychologist Angela Lee Duckworth extols the virtues of grit, saying that “grittier” kids—those who try harder and don’t give up over the long haul—do better in school. For that matter, “grittier” adults do better in their jobs and goals, too. In fact, when it comes to success, Dr. Duckworth says “grit” is a better indicator of future success than IQ.

So how do we build grit in kids and adults? Dr. Duckworth says the best idea she’s heard so far is something called “growth mindset.” She quotes Stanford University’s Dr. Carol Dweck who says that  “growth mindset” is the belief that the ability to learn is not fixed, that it can change with effort. According to Dr. Dweck, when kids read and learn about the brain and how it changes and grows in response to challenge, they’re more likely to persevere when they fail.

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