Category: Brain Training

Try Brain Training for Yourself!

aAre you ready to give your brain a workout? One of the best ways to boost your brain power is to stress your brain with intense mental exercise, kind of like you might work out a muscle. When you do this, it strengthens the brain’s core cognitive skills, which happen to be the same skills your brain uses to think and learn.

This six-minute video walks you through the first couple levels of a LearningRx brain training exercise. There are many more levels of this exercise that our trainers can get you to. And this is just one exercise! LearningRx brain trainers have more than a hundred exercises and levels to choose from as they customize every workout to give you a faster, smarter, more efficient brain.

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Can Attention be Trained? Seniors (and Babies) Prove It Can

Baby girl playing outdoorsWhen TV newscaster Diane Sawyer was asked the secret of her success, she said, “I think the one lesson I’ve learned is there is no substitute for paying attention.”

If you struggle with ADHD, however, that’s a lot easier said than done.

About 6 million children and teens have been diagnosed with ADHD, with an estimated four percent of U.S. adults struggling with the disorder as well.

The good news is that support and education help. Plus, there are things you can do. In fact, if you’re looking for something you can do to help yourself or a child who struggles, two studies on attention are worth, well, paying attention to.

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The Key To Success

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TEDResearch shows that kids with lots of grit (and less mental ability) are more successful than kids with lots of mental ability (but less grit). In this video, researcher and psychologist Angela Lee Duckworth extols the virtues of grit, saying that “grittier” kids—those who try harder and don’t give up over the long haul—do better in school. For that matter, “grittier” adults do better in their jobs and goals, too. In fact, when it comes to success, Dr. Duckworth says “grit” is a better indicator of future success than IQ.

So how do we build grit in kids and adults? Dr. Duckworth says the best idea she’s heard so far is something called “growth mindset.” She quotes Stanford University’s Dr. Carol Dweck who says that  “growth mindset” is the belief that the ability to learn is not fixed, that it can change with effort. According to Dr. Dweck, when kids read and learn about the brain and how it changes and grows in response to challenge, they’re more likely to persevere when they fail.

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Smarter

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smarter

Dan Hurley is the award-winning science journalist who, last year, wrote The New York Times article “The Brain Trainers” in which LearningRx was featured. His latest book, Smarter, has just been released. In the book, Hurley takes a look at the science and the methods associated with what he calls the “new field of intelligence research.” In the process, he devotes six pages to describing his visit to a LearningRx center and his conversations with various parents and students.

His observations are fascinating. After a couple paragraphs in which he points out the need for more published research (he also seems to find it odd that LearningRx is organized as a franchise, “like MacDonald’s”), Hurley dives into talking about two of LearningRx’s most important distinctives: the one-on-one training model, and the dramatic results experienced by LearningRx clients.

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Beyond the Breakfast Table

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News

When you read a newspaper article at the breakfast table then think, “What did I just read?” it’s annoying. But what if the same was true at work when you read an important document before a big meeting? Or when your boss asked for your opinion of written text on the spot? Surely you don’t want to have to read something three times while he looks on!

Now imagine your child (or teen) going through the same thing at school. They read much slower than their classmates, or read quickly but have no idea what they just read. This is a common problem – even among “good” readers — and it’s about weak reading comprehension. In fact, 37 percent of fourth graders tested at “below basic” in their reading skills and one out of four eighth graders is functionally illiterate!

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